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Destinations and their iconic beverages (part 1)

Destinations and their iconic beverages (part 1)

Drinking the iconic beverages of a destination is as important as tasting their local dishes and today we’ll be taking a look at some major destinations and their iconic beverages.

Japan – Sake

Also called ‘nihonshu’, the Japanese traditional ‘sake’ is a rice wine with an alcohol content of anywhere between 15% to 17%.

Long before the first sake bewery was established in Kyoto’s Imperial Palace back in the 7th century, the drink was consumed in a form that more resembled a porridge rather than the current day transparent liquid.

Nowadays there are over 1,600 bewers who produce a wide variety of sake types, ranging from sweet to crisp to fragranty fruity. Sake’s best qualities can be detected when it is served slightly chilled, but it can also be served at room temperature or heated, depending on what the drinker prefers, the quality of the sake as well as the season.

Ireland – Guinness

Guinness is the world-renown Irish beer, which requires a particular ritual of pouring; a perfect pint has to be filled in two-parts and that’s why it takes 119.5 seconds to pour the ideal pint. The drink is malt-and-caramel flavored and actually has a ruby colour, rather than a black one. Guiness is called a malt-heavy porter because it was the favorite beverage of porters.

Belgium – Beer

Belgium produces somewhere around 450 varieties of beer, each of them having a particularly designed and shaped glass. Considering the sheer number of beers that are brewed here, it makes sense that at least some of them are world-renown.

The Trappist dark ales were first brewed by the monks who fled France after the Napoelonic period, with the best known of them being Chimay, which is served in a goblet-like glass.

Hoegaarden is a very good example of Belgian Witbier – white beer – which is distinguished by its pale golden color, extra fizz and hints of herbs.

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